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basics:summer [2020/08/05 16:18]
wfeist [Base case of a Passive House with tilted windows when required]
basics:summer [2021/10/13 10:44] (current)
corinna.geiger@passiv.de
Line 3: Line 3:
 ===== Summer climate in the Passive House – an important issue ===== ===== Summer climate in the Passive House – an important issue =====
  
-The question of low-energy buildings overheating in summer "due to their high level of insulation"​ is still one that is frequently raised in the public debate.((First of all, some general remarks concerning the laws of physics: **insulation does not "​create"​ any additional heat**; it only reduces the heat exchange between systems with different temperatures. ​ Therefore, it also protects a cool system from gaining heat from the surroundings. ​ For this reason, cooling devices are thermally protected – a popular example is that of keeping chilled water cool in a (well-insulating) thermos flask.)) In this study we document research on a residential ​passive houses ​in climates, where a passive temperature control in summer is possible (as was up to the year 2003 the case in most parts of Central Europe). Practical experience with such passive summer performance of Passive Houses has clearly shown that these houses have a pleasant (cool) indoor climate even during excessively hot Central European periods. However, this requires **professional planning**, made possible by reliable tools like the [[planning:​calculating_energy_efficiency:​phpp_-_the_passive_house_planning_package|PHPP]]. The PHPP implemented a [[:​a_simplified_method_for_determining_thermal_comfort_in_summer_for_buildings_without_active_cooling|passive cooling sheet]]. This article deals with the summer characteristics of Passive Houses in climates such as that in Central Europe – where residential buildings typically did not require active cooling so far. This may change with climate change, if the frequency of tropical nights will further increase.\\+The question of low-energy buildings overheating in summer "due to their high level of insulation"​ is still one that is frequently raised in the public debate.((First of all, some general remarks concerning the laws of physics: **insulation does not "​create"​ any additional heat**; it only reduces the heat exchange between systems with different temperatures. ​ Therefore, it also protects a cool system from gaining heat from the surroundings. ​ For this reason, cooling devices are thermally protected – a popular example is that of keeping chilled water cool in a (well-insulating) thermos flask.)) In this study we document research on a residential ​Passive Houses ​in climates, where a passive temperature control in summer is possible (as was up to the year 2003 the case in most parts of Central Europe). Practical experience with such passive summer performance of Passive Houses has clearly shown that these houses have a pleasant (cool) indoor climate even during excessively hot Central European periods. However, this requires **professional planning**, made possible by reliable tools like the [[planning:​calculating_energy_efficiency:​phpp_-_the_passive_house_planning_package|PHPP]]. The PHPP implemented a [[:​a_simplified_method_for_determining_thermal_comfort_in_summer_for_buildings_without_active_cooling|passive cooling sheet]]. This article deals with the summer characteristics of Passive Houses in climates such as that in Central Europe – where residential buildings typically did not require active cooling so far. This may change with climate change, if the frequency of tropical nights will further increase.\\
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basics/summer.txt · Last modified: 2021/10/13 10:44 by corinna.geiger@passiv.de